Factor to Consider when doing SEO

Emmanuel

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May 11, 2020
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Broad Keyword Use in Page Title

Why it's an issue:When search engines rank your page for a keyword, the <title> tag is the most important place for the keyword to appear. Use the exact keyword or phrase in your title to help search engines associate the page with a topic and/or set of terms. See Title Tag.How to fix it:Add some form of your targeted keywords early in your <title> tag, preferably as one of the first words. Exact keywords are preferable.Optimal Format<title>Primary Keyword - Secondary Keyword - Brand</title>Sample<title>SEO Software, Tools and Resources for Better Marketing - Moz</title>

Rand Fishkin

Rand says: Page titles are the most important place to put your keywords. A compelling title element that employs your targeted keyword wisely both helps your rank and earns you more clicks from searchers.



Exact Keyword is Used in Page Title

Why it's an issue:When search engines rank your page for a keyword, the <title> tag is the most important place for the keyword to appear. Use the exact keyword or phrase in your title to help search engines associate the page with a topic and/or set of terms. See Title Tag.How to fix it:Add the exact keywords early in your <title> tag, preferably as one of the first words.Optimal Format<title>Primary Keyword - Secondary Keyword - Brand</title>Sample<title>SEO Software, Tools and Resources for Better Marketing - Moz</title>

Rand Fishkin

Rand says: Exact keyword matches aren't as critical today as in years past, but they can still make a difference for rankings, the anchor text you'll receive from editorial links, and click-through rate (CTR).



Keyword Placement in Page Title

Why it's an issue:When search engines rank your page for a keyword, the <title> tag is the most important place for the keyword to appear. Use the exact keyword or phrase in your title to help search engines associate the page with a topic and/or set of terms. See Title Tag.How to fix it:Move your targeted keywords closer to the beginning of your <title> tag, preferrably first.Optimal Format<title>Primary Keyword - Secondary Keyword - Brand</title>Sample<title>SEO Software, Tools and Resources for Better Marketing - Moz</title>

Jen Lopez

Jen says: Put your best foot forward! You want the search engines, and searchers, to understand what the page is about. Put those keywords in the beginning so there is no question.



Use Keywords in your URL

Why it's an issue:Use your targeted keywords in the URL string to add relevancy to your page for search engine rankings, help potential visitors identify the topic of your page from the URL, and provide SEO value when used as the anchor text of referring links. For multi-word phrases, hyphens allow the search engines to read the URL as separate words. See 15 SEO Best Practices for Structuring URLs.How to fix it:Use your targeted keywords in the URL string of the page. Use hyphens to separate individual words for a multi-word phrase.Optimal Formatwww.mysite.com/my-keyword-phraseSamplemoz.com/beginners-guide-to-seo

Dr. Pete Meyers

Dr. Pete says: Warning: This is a great improvement for a site launch or redesign, but don't change your sitewide URLs just to tweak a few keywords. Moving URLs is tricky business.











Keywords in the Meta Description

Why it's an issue:If your keywords are in the meta description tag, it is more likely search engines will use it as the snippet that describes your page. Potential visitors see the keyword bolded in the snippet, which increases your page's prominence and visibility. Be careful not to use keywords excessively, however, as it can be seen as spam by both search engines and potential visitors, and can reduce the chance potential visitors will click through to your page. See Meta Description.How to fix it:Use your targeted keywords at least once, but no more than three times in the meta description tag.Optimal FormatMeta Description content should be between 50-300 characters, and be a useful description of the page that will drive search clicks.Sample<meta name="description" content="Get SEO best practices for the meta description tag, including length and content." />

Rand Fishkin

Rand says: Keywords here won't help you rank, but they do get bolded on the search results page and can help signal to searchers that you have a relevant result to answer their query.



Optimal Use of Keywords in Header Tags

Why it's an issue:Although using targeted keywords in H1 tags on your page does not directly correlate to high rankings, it does appear to provide some slight value. It's also considered a best practice for accessibility and helps potential visitors determine your page's content, so we recommend it. Over-using keywords, however, can be perceived as keyword stuffing (a form of search engine spam) and can negatively impact rankings, so use keywords in H1 tags two or fewer times. To adhere to best practices in Google News and Bing News, headlines should contain the relevant keyword target and be treated with the same importance as title tags. See On-Page SEO for 2019.How to fix it:Use your targeted keywords at the beginning of your H1 headers once or twice (but not more) on the page.Optimal Format<h1>keywords in my headers</h1>Sample<h1>The Moz Blog</h1>

Cyrus Shepard

Cyrus says: When visitors first land on your page, it's important they know straight away what the page is about and can find the information they are looking for easily.



Avoid Too Many Internal Links

Why it's an issue:Google has confirmed that the use of too many internal links on a page will not trigger a penalty, but it can influence the quantity of link juice sent through those links and dilute your page's ability to have search engines crawl, index, and rank link targets. See How Many Links is Too Many?How to fix it:Scale down the number of internal links on your page to fewer than 100, if possible. At a minimum, try to keep navigation and menu links to fewer than 100.


Rand Fishkin

Rand says: More than 100 links on a page isn't always terrible, but it could mean that A) search engines don't follow them all, and B) users struggle to navigate. That 100 link limit has also long been a Google-recommended guideline.